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Monday, September 20, 2010

Japanese Manga 'Yaoi' - Lesson 3

Japanese Manga ‘Yaoi’ – Lesson 3

Lesson 3


'Others words associated with yaoi.'

Here it is, the last of my lessons in Japanese Manga and I’ll be honest, I’m not sure if I entirely agree with the explanations of each word listed below. For instance, the word Shota, I don’t feel the explanation for this word is really one hundred percent accurate. According to anime/manga fans, that I’ve met, they tell me this is like child porn and I have to agree after seeing about five minutes of one anime I care not to mention. I’ve heard people argue that it’s only animated… But for me it’s just the thought. The characters are always so young–barely pubescent it seems. And though it is animated how far would you go? My opinion…I detest Shota and I’m being polite here. I think it’s sick. So a word of warning, do your research before diving into major anime/manga viewing!

Moving along to much nicer things… I finally received another Ebay item today, an OVA titled ‘Cicada in Winter! What an awesome OVA! The story is very romantic in this one and the sex is very hot, and the ending…well predictable I guess. I will say no more! No spoilers here! The artistry and story is by Youka Nitta (Haru wo Daiteita-Embracing Love/When a Man Loves a Man etc). Her characters (Iwaki and Katou) are beautiful. Cicada in Winter is military based and an offshoot story from the Embracing Love manga series. What I mean by this is, the two main male characters in Embracing Love are AVI actors and Cicada in Winter is a movie they did…lol if that makes any sense at all! It will once you read the manga series and it is a long one, so be prepared.

I’ve added a photo of my OVA! I’m sorry for the reflection, there’s a huge window behind my computer and the light bounced off the CD case. And yes…my fingers lol Enjoy the info and until my next blog...

Happy yaoi hunting!
Blak Rayne ^_^!!

Section C (K to Z and not in alphabetical order)


Kanji: Japanese characters/letters based directly on Chinese writing; each kanji usually has a specific meaning and several readings.
Katakana: Japanese characters/letters used to write words of a foreign origin. Fantasy-based words, sound effects and some characters names are written in katakana.
Kawaii: Japanese for ‘cute’. A very popular word used among North American anime fans used to describe things that are, well, cute.
Masochism: Pleasure from receiving pain.
Mary-Sue: Perfect female character, usually OC; deeply hated.
Mpreg: Male pregnancy.
Manga: Japanese for ‘comics’. In American fandom it's used to refer to Japanese comics specifically. Unlike American comics, which are basically limited to the superhero and comedy genres, the manga industry is enormous in Japan and manga encompasses an extremely wide range of genres and tastes. Most anime TV shows have a manga series that they're based on.
Mecha: A genre of anime/manga that involves giant, often anthropomorphic robots that are usually piloted by humans. Examples of mecha anime include Neon Genesis Evangelion, Gundam Wing, and Robotech.
Moe: A fairly recent but increasingly popular type of anime character and also a genre. Moe refers to the archetype of cute, warm, innocent and often at times under-age girls in anime that evoke some passion or arousal from male viewers. The stereotypical moe character is a cute, polite, naive, submissive and vulnerable young girl who makes others want to protect her.
Miyazaki, Hayao: One of the best and most well-known anime movie directors of all time. Along with his friend Isao Takahata, he founded his own animation studio, Studio Ghibli, and has produced many well-loved films. Some of his most famous works include My Neighbor Totoro, Kiki's Delivery Service, Princess Mononoke, Laputa: The Castle in The Sky and Spirited Away. All of his films have a universal feel to them, involving characters and situations that anyone could relate to. As Miyazaki once said, his movies are for ‘Those who will be ten years old and those who have been ten years old’.
Oneshot: A story with a single chapter, no matter what length.
OC: Original character.
OOC: Out of Character.
OTP: One true Pairing or for Twincest fans (Only Twinscest please).
OAV or OVA: Stands for Original Animation Video or Original Video Animation. OAVs are usually a series of anime episodes made exclusively for home video release and not for TV or cinema. OAVs usually have longer and better episodes (since they don't have to worry about TV censorship) and better animation. An OAV could be based on an already existing anime TV series or it could be a totally original story.
Opening Theme: Also called an opening song or intro. Refers to the song sung at the start of every episode of an anime series while the beginning credits role, much like the ‘theme songs’ of many American TV shows. However, the songs of anime opening themes are usually much more symbolic and they're made to flow specifically with the animation being shown. Almost every anime has an opening theme that usually changes each season or if the animes plot changes significantly. The opening theme is usually more fast-paced, exciting and enticing than the ending theme.
OST: Refers to Original Sound Track. An OST is a music CD including all of the major background music and songs from a given anime series.
Otaku: A derogatory Japanese word used to refer to anyone who's totally obsessed with any one thing. In American anime fandom however, it's less derogatory and is used to refer to someone who's obsessed with anime and manga.
PWP: Plot? What Plot? or Porn without Plot.
RP: Role Play between 2 or more people.
Self-Insert: Where the author places himself or herself inside the story.
Shonen: Ai- Boy love.
Shota- Yaoi: Involving young boys.
Slash: English term for Yaoi, non-canon.
Scanlation: Like a fansub except for manga instead of anime. A scanlation of a manga is when the original Japanese writing is edited out and replaced with a fan's translation
SD: An acronym for ‘super deformed’; similar to chibi (see Chibi) but even more smaller and chubbier.
Seiyuu: Japanese for ‘voice actor/actess’. American anime fans use it to refer to the Japanese people who do the voices for anime characters. Like the anime shows themselves. Seiyuus have their own fan following too.
Side Story: A story set in the same world as an already existing anime/manga but focusing on different subjects, such as minor characters, new characters or subtle plots that aren't really talked about in the actual series.
Shoujo: Japanese for ‘girl’ but it's also an anime/manga genre. Shoujo anime/manga usually have a target audience of young girls and involve a lot of emotional female characters and effeminate, attractive male characters. They're drawn in a pretty, flowery, romantic style and the plots are mainly focused on character relationships and interpersonal conflicts. Examples of shoujo anime/manga include Fushigi Yugi, Revolutionary Girl Utena and Fruits Basket.
Shoujo - Ai: (see Yuri)
Shounen: Japanese for ‘boy’ but it's also an anime/manga genre. Shounen anime/manga usually have a target audience of young boys and involve mostly fiery male characters (who usually have super powers of some kind) and evil characters (many of which eventually become good guys). They're drawn in a sharp, hard-core style and are mainly focused on fast-paced but often complex plot lines, with a lot of fighting and action scenes. Examples of shounen anime/manga include Dragon Ball Z, Yu Yu Hakusho, Bleach, and Naruto.
Shounen - Ai: (see Yaoi)
Sub: Short for ‘subtitled’. Refers to the anime in the original Japanese dialogue with subtitles in another language (usually English).
Twincest- Incest between twins.
Takahashi, Rumiko: Considered by many to be the best manga artist of all, she's made tons of different manga series, most of which have become extremely popular both in Japan and America. Some of her most well known titles include Inuyasha, Ranma 1/2, Maison Ikkoku, and Urusei Yatsura. A key to many of her stories' popularity is that they involve very complex relationships, ongoing plot lines and clever humour.
Tankouban: Japanese word for a volume or graphic novel of a manga series.
Tezuka, Osamu: considered the ‘Father of Anime’, almost all modern anime are based on his drawing style (which was greatly inspired by Walt Disney) and he practically invented Japan's modern manga industry during the 1960s. A couple of his most famous works include Astro Boy, which is considered the very first modern-style anime (and the first to be released in America) and Jungle Emperor Leo, which aired in America during the 1960s under the name Kimba the White Lion.
WAFF: Warm and Fuzzy Feelings. Usually found in Fluff.
Yaoi: An anime/manga story in which the plot is centered around a romantic relationship between two male characters and usually at least one of is very effeminate. There is a good amount of yaoi in many actual anime/manga series, but yaoi is mostly seen in the world of anime fan art and fan fics, in which the fans (usually girls) take the male characters of a particular anime/manga series and put them in gay relationships. Yaoi relationships are also referred to as ‘shounen-ai’, meaning ‘boy's love’.
Yuri: The same as yaoi (see Yaoi above), but with the romance relationship being between two female characters. Yuri relationships are also referred to as ‘shoujo-ai’, meaning ‘girl's love’. 


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